[LyX/master] Cmake build: Files already removed, but in 'git status' still present.

Kornel Benko kornel at lyx.org
Sat Feb 15 08:55:26 UTC 2020


commit 43dfd12fd7988e5433f7ec479a7b73a24855bcf5
Author: Kornel Benko <kornel at lyx.org>
Date:   Sat Feb 15 10:11:28 2020 +0100

    Cmake build: Files already removed, but in 'git status' still present.
    
    This is a try to really remove them.
---
 development/batchtests/beamer_test.tex.orig  |  810 --------------------------
 development/cmake/modules/FindEnchant.cmake  |   22 -
 development/cmake/modules/FindHunspell.cmake |   21 -
 3 files changed, 0 insertions(+), 853 deletions(-)

diff --git a/development/batchtests/beamer_test.tex.orig b/development/batchtests/beamer_test.tex.orig
deleted file mode 100644
index 410e4dc..0000000
--- a/development/batchtests/beamer_test.tex.orig
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,810 +0,0 @@
-%% LyX 2.4.0dev created this file.  For more info, see https://www.lyx.org/.
-%% Do not edit unless you really know what you are doing.
-\documentclass[english]{beamer}
-\usepackage{lmodern}
-\renewcommand{\sfdefault}{lmss}
-\renewcommand{\ttdefault}{lmtt}
-\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
-\usepackage[latin9]{inputenc}
-\geometry{verbose}
-\setcounter{secnumdepth}{3}
-\setcounter{tocdepth}{3}
-\usepackage{babel}
-\usepackage{url}
-\ifx\hypersetup\undefined
-  \AtBeginDocument{%
-    \hypersetup{unicode=true}
-  }
-\else
-  \hypersetup{unicode=true}
-\fi
-
-\makeatletter
-
-%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% LyX specific LaTeX commands.
-\providecommand{\LyX}{\texorpdfstring{\ensureascii{%
-  L\kern-.1667em\lower.25em\hbox{Y}\kern-.125emX\@}}{LyX}}
-\DeclareRobustCommand*{\lyxarrow}{%
-\@ifstar
-{\leavevmode\,$\triangleleft$\,\allowbreak}
-{\leavevmode\,$\triangleright$\,\allowbreak}}
-
-%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% Textclass specific LaTeX commands.
-% this default might be overridden by plain title style
-\newcommand\makebeamertitle{\frame{\maketitle}}%
-% (ERT) argument for the TOC
-\AtBeginDocument{%
-  \let\origtableofcontents=\tableofcontents
-  \def\tableofcontents{\@ifnextchar[{\origtableofcontents}{\gobbletableofcontents}}
-  \def\gobbletableofcontents#1{\origtableofcontents}
-}
-\providecommand{\shortcut}[1]{\mbox{\textsf{#1}}}
-
-%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%%% User specified LaTeX commands.
-% We use the "Berkeley" theme with a 3.45em-wide side bar on the left
-\usetheme[left,width=3.45em]{Berkeley}
-
-\makeatother
-
-\begin{document}
-\begin{frame}
-
-\frametitle<presentation>{Contents}
-
-\tableofcontents{}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{Purposes}
-\begin{frame}[<+->]{Purpose of the Beamer class}
-
-With the \structure{Beamer} class, you can produce presentation slides,
-which
-\begin{itemize}
-\item are visually highly customizable
-\item can be very well structured
-\item can be constructed step-by-step (``overlay'' concept)
-\item may contain different navigation paths (note that the slides contain
-all sorts of hyperlinks)
-\item use \LaTeX 's superb output quality
-\item might embed multimedia content (audio, video)
-\item can easily be transformed to accompanying material (such as an article-like
-handout)
-\item and much more \ldots{}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Purpose of this presentation}
-
-This presentation
-\begin{itemize}
-\item describes some basic features of \structure{Beamer}
-\item especially how they can be used with \LyX{}
-\end{itemize}
-For more general and comprehensive information on \structure{Beamer}
-itself, please refer to the extensive class manual \cite{beamer-ug}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{Segments of a presentation}
-\begin{frame}{The global structure}
-
-A presentation usually consists of
-\begin{itemize}
-\item a title page
-\item slides that might be grouped to sections/parts
-\item an appendix with additional information, such as a bibliography
-\end{itemize}
-We describe these global segments in what follows.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{The title page}
-
-Within \LyX , a title page is constructed by the layouts \structure{Title},
-\structure{Subtitle}, \structure{Author}, \structure{Institute},
-\structure{Date} and \structure{TitleGraphic}. 
-\begin{itemize}
-\item None of these elements is mandatory, but at least one must be given 
-\item The order of insertion does not matter (the real order is defined
-in the \structure{Beamer} theme)
-\item For \structure{Title}, \structure{Subtitle}, \structure{Author},
-\structure{Institute} and \structure{Date}, you can define ``short''
-forms via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Short Title\slash Date\slash\ldots}
-These are used in the sidebar\slash heading (given the theme actually
-provides a sidebar\slash heading)
-\item If you select \structure{Title (Plain Frame)} instead of \structure{Title},
-the title page will have no sidebar or heading
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Slides/Frames}
-
-Slides are called ``frames'' in \structure{Beamer}. Everything
-inside a frame is put on one slide (which itself might consist of
-sub-slides).
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Select the \structure{Frame} style to start a frame
-\item The frame title is to be inserted in the ``Frame title'' inset,
-which is automatically inserted for new frames or can be manually
-inserted via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Frame Title}
-\item Alternatively, you can also use the \structure{FrameTitle} layout,
-which additionally offers a (rarely used) short frame title option,
-and, more importantly, overlay options
-\item A subtitle can be added via the \structure{FrameSubtitle} layout
-\item Frame options (see \cite{beamer-ug} for the diverse options) are
-inserted via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Frame Options}, overlay options
-via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Overlay Specifications} and \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Default Overlay Specifications}
-(we explain later what this is)
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}<1-2>[label=myframe]{Frames can be repeated}
-
-Frames can be repeated fully or only in terms of selected sub-slides,
-multiple times at any later point of the presentation.
-
-You just need to give the respective frame a label name via the frame
-option ``label'' (as done here).
-
-\pause{}
-
-Then you can repeat this frame by means of the \structure{AgainFrame}
-layout later in the presentation. Just enter the label name in the
-\structure{AgainFrame} layout and specify, if required, which sub-slides
-you want to be repeated via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Overlay Specifications}
-(again, see below for the concept of ``overlays'').
-\begin{proof}<3>
-\alert{Here's the proof!} (This text is only shown on sub-slide
-3 which is itself only shown when this frame is repeated later on)
-\end{proof}
-
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Keeping frames together}
-
-\framesubtitle{Use nesting!}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Note that all frame content, if the style is not \structure{Frame},
-must be nested to the frame environment (via \alert{Edit\lyxarrow Increase List Depth}
-or \shortcut{Alt+Shift+Right}). This is done automatically if you
-insert new frame paragraphs.
-\item Nested content is marked by a red bar in the margin of the \LyX{} workarea
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Non-nested content (such as this) will also be displayed in the presentation
-(on a separate slide), but not properly aligned
-\item So please avoid this
-\end{itemize}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Separating frames}
-
-\noindent Consecutive frames have to be separated from each other.
-This is done by means of the \structure{Separator} inset, which can
-be produced by hitting return in an empty Standard paragraph right
-below the frame (see UserGuide, sec.~3.4.6).
-\begin{block}{Tip}
-
-There is a simple and much more convenient way to start a new frame:
-Issue \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Separated Frame Below} (\shortcut{undefined}
-if you are in a non-nested \structure{Frame} paragraph, or \shortcut{Alt+P Shift+Return},
-respectively, if you are in a nested paragraph within the frame).
-If you are in the frame heading, \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Separated Frame Above}
-inserts a new, properly separated frame above the current one!
-\end{block}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\againframe<3>{myframe}
-
-\begin{frame}[plain]{Special frame types}
-
-\LyX{} provides two special frame types:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\item \structure{Frame (plain)} is a frame without a sidebar/header (such
-as this one). This is useful for slides with much content\slash wide
-tables
-\item \structure{Frame (fragile)} is to be used if the frame consists of
-``fragile'' content, especially verbatim stuff such as program listings
-\end{enumerate}
-If you want a fragile plain frame, pass the option ``plain'' to
-a fragile frame or the option ``fragile'' to a plain frame.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Sectioning a presentation}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item To group frames, you can use the usual sectioning commands (\structure{Section},
-\structure{Subsection} etc.)
-\item These are shown in the table of contents, the sidebar\slash header
-(depending on the theme) and the article output (for ``article''
-see below, the section on ``modes'')
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Parts have special meaning}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item You can also divide your presentation into \structure{Parts}. Note,
-however, that parts behave differently in \structure{Beamer} than
-in other document classes: a part is considered to be ``a little
-`talk of its own' with its own table of contents, its own navigation
-bars, and so on.'' \cite[sec.~10.3]{beamer-ug}
-\item This means, for instance, that if you use parts, the table of contents
-will only list the sections and subsections of the part that contains
-this table of contents, and the sidebar\slash header will also only
-show the sections of the current part.
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Re-arranging frames}
-\begin{block}{Tip}
-
-Did you know that you can easily move and re-arrange whole frames
-via the outliner (\alert{View\lyxarrow Outline Pane})?
-
-Also, you can navigate to a specific frame via the \alert{Navigate}
-menu!
-\end{block}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{The appendix}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Appendices might be useful for additional\slash reserve material.
-The appendix is part of the presentation, but not shown in the table
-of contents\slash sidebar\slash header
-\item An appendix is inserted as usual in \LyX :
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Use \alert{Document\lyxarrow Start Appendix Here} at the position
-where the appendix should begin
-\end{itemize}
-\item Typical content of the appendix is the bibliography
-\begin{itemize}
-\item You insert it as in all other \LyX{} classes, via the \structure{Bibliography}
-style (see the bibliography at the end of this presentation as an
-example)
-\item Note that you can also use Bib\TeX , although not all Bib\TeX{} styles
-are prepared to work with \structure{Beamer}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{The overlay concept}
-\begin{frame}{What are overlays?}
-
-Basically, the overlay concept allows to change the slide content
-dynamically. You can uncover things/text piecewise, fade out content,
-highlight things, replace text, images etc.
-
-\pause{}
-\begin{itemize}[<+->]
-\item Overlays are useful to build up slides as you speak
-\item They help you to shift your audience's focus on specific things
-\item And they help your audience to follow you
-\item So use overlays! \alert<6>{Really, use them!}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Overlay types}
-
-\structure{Beamer} provides many different overlay types. The most
-important ones are:
-\begin{description}
-\item [{Hidden~content:}] Stuff that is completely invisible up to a point
-\item [{Covered~content:}] Stuff that is faded out (not completely invisible)
-\item [{Highlighted~content:}] Stuff that is somehow emphasized at a certain
-point
-\end{description}
-We give examples for these types in what follows, but begin with some
-general remarks on overlay possibilities
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{General overlay/action possibilities}
-
-Many \structure{Beamer} elements provide overlay settings. Basically,
-you can define on which sub-slide(s) a given content appears (``2'',
-``2-4'', ``3-'', ``1,3'' etc.), or in which output mode (``presentation'',
-``article'' etc.)
-\begin{itemize}
-\item In \LyX , these settings are generally accessible via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Overlay Specifications}
-or \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Action Specifications}
-\end{itemize}
-\begin{overprint}
-\onslide<2> 
-\begin{definition}
-``Action'' is a more general concept, which does not only include
-what we have called ``overlays'' (``on which sub-slide{[}s{]} is
-this to be shown\slash hidden\slash highlighted''), but also tasks
-such as ``only show this in the presentation, not on the handout''
-or ``show this on the second screen only'' (so-called ``modes'').
-\end{definition}
-
-\onslide<3> 
-\begin{alertblock}{Note to the \LaTeX{} aficionados}
-
-The mentioned overlay/action settings conform to those command/environment
-options embraced by\alert{\ <\ldots >} and \alert{{[}<\ldots >{]}}
-in the \LaTeX{} output.
-
-Note that \LyX{} adds those braces on export, so you must not enter
-them yourself. In other words, enter ``1'' or ``+-'' to the overlay/action
-insets, not ``<1>'' or ``{[}<+->{]}''!
-\end{alertblock}
-\end{overprint}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{An example}
-
-Take for example a quote. In a \structure{Quote} environment, you
-can specify the overlay settings via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Overlay Specifications}.
-If you do this and enter ``2'', the quote will only appear on (sub-)slide
-2:
-\begin{quote}<2>
-Fear no more the heat o\textquoteright{} the sun
-
-Nor the furious winter\textquoteright s rages
-
-Thou thy worldly task hast done
-
-Home art gone, and ta\textquoteright en thy wages
-\end{quote}
-This is how the concept works, basically.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Covering vs. hiding}
-
-The difference between ``covering'' and ``hiding'' is that hidden
-content is treated as if it isn't there, while covered content is
-just covered (and the space is reserved). If we would have hidden
-the quote on the last slide and not covered, it would only have taken
-space on appearance:
-\begin{quote}<only at 2>
-Fear no more the heat o\textquoteright{} the sun
-
-Nor the furious winter\textquoteright s rages
-
-Thou thy worldly task hast done
-
-Home art gone, and ta\textquoteright en thy wages
-\end{quote}
-
-You can see how this text moves when the quote is un-hidden.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Coverage degrees}
-
-\setbeamercovered{transparent}
-
-\structure{Beamer} offers several degrees of ``coverage'', which
-can be set via the command \alert{\textbackslash setbeamercovered}
-either globally (for the whole presentation) or locally (e.\,g. for
-a single frame, as here). By default, content is completely covered.
-In ``transparent'' mode, you can see covered text greyed-out:
-\begin{quote}<2>
-Fear no more the heat o\textquoteright{} the sun
-
-Nor the furious winter\textquoteright s rages
-
-Thou thy worldly task hast done
-
-Home art gone, and ta\textquoteright en thy wages
-\end{quote}
-Check the \structure{Beamer} manual for more possibilities.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Default overlay/action specifications vs.\\
-(normal) overlay/action specifications}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item For some environments (such as lists and also frames), you can set
-``default specifications'' additionally to normal overlay/action
-specifications (or in the case of lists: ``overlay specifications''
-for the whole list and ``item overlay specifications'' for singular
-items)
-\item Default specifications apply to all content of the given environment,
-if not individually specified otherwise
-\item They use a placeholder syntax. E.\,g., ``+(1)-'' will uncover all
-items in a list step by step (with a start offset of 1) if they have
-no individual item specification:
-\begin{itemize}[<+(1)->]
-\item One
-\item Two
-\item Three
-\item<1-> Always
-\end{itemize}
-\end{itemize}
-Please consult the \structure{Beamer} manual for details on this
-syntax.
-
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}[<+->]{Default overlay/action specifications vs.\\
-(normal) overlay/action specifications}
-
-\noindent This frame uses a specific default overlay specification
-
-which causes each overlay-aware paragraph \ldots{}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item \ldots{} or list item \ldots{}
-\item \ldots{} to appear \ldots{}
-\item \ldots{} on a subsequent sub-slide \ldots{}
-\end{itemize}
-\begin{block}{A block}
-
-\ldots{} one after the other
-\end{block}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}[<alert at +>]{Default overlay/action specifications vs.\\
-(normal) overlay/action specifications}
-
-\noindent And this frame uses a specific default overlay specification
-\ldots{}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item \ldots{} which causes each overlay-aware list item \ldots{}
-\item \ldots{} to be highlighted \ldots{}
-\item \ldots{} on respective sub-slides
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Pause}
-
-The \structure{Pause} layout lets you mark a point where all following
-content will be covered (by default for one slide, with regard to
-the content preceding the pause):
-
-\pause{}
-
-After first pause
-
-\pause{}
-
-After second pause
-
-\pause[2]{}
-
-By default, consecutive pauses also end consecutively. 
-
-Via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Pause Number}, however, you can specify
-a specific sub-slide at which the given pause ends, independent from
-the number of pauses inserted before this one.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Paragraph-wide overlays}
-
-\structure{Beamer} and \LyX{} provide you with paragraph layouts whose
-purpose it is to show/hide whole paragraphs or sequences of paragraphs
-on specific slides. These are particularly:
-\begin{uncoverenv}<2->
-
-The \structure{Uncovered} layout which uncovers all content on the
-specified slides \ldots{}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item \ldots{} including nested paragraphs of other layout.
-\end{itemize}
-\end{uncoverenv}
-
-\begin{onlyenv}<3->
-
-The \structure{Only} layout which un-hides content (note again how
-the surrounding text ``moves'' when this gets visible).
-\end{onlyenv}
-
-\begin{overprint}
-\onslide<4> 
-
-And the \structure{Overprint} environment which lets you enter \ldots{}
-\onslide<5> 
-
-\ldots{} alternative text taking a specific space on specified slides.
-
-\end{overprint}
-as demonstrated here.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Inline overlays}
-
-\setbeamercovered{transparent}
-
-\structure{Beamer} also supports inline overlays for text parts (as
-opposed to whole paragraphs), which are accessible via \alert{Edit\lyxarrow Text Style}
-in \LyX :
-\begin{itemize}
-\item You can \structure{uncover} \uncover<2->{text} on specific slides
-\item You can make \visible<3->{text} \structure{visible} (which makes
-a difference to ``uncover'' only with ``transparent'' coverage
-setting, as used locally on this slide)
-\item You can show \only<4->{text }\structure{only} on specific slides
-\item You can make \invisible<5->{text} \structure{invisible}
-\item And you can show \alt<6->{different}{\structure{alternative}} text
-\end{itemize}
-As for the paragraph layouts, the overlay settings can be accessed
-via the \alert{Insert} menu.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Overlay-aware commands}
-
-Many ``inline'' commands (also to be found at \alert{Edit\lyxarrow Text Style})
-are overlay-aware. 
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Thus, you can make for instance text on specific slides \emph<2>{emphasized},
-\textbf<3>{bold}, shown in \alert<4>{alert} or \structure<5>{structure}
-color.
-\end{itemize}
-\begin{block}<6>{Tip}
-
-Use these Emphasize and Bold insets (instead of the usual respective
-font settings) also if you do not need overlay specifications. Due
-to the way emphasized and bold is defined in \structure{Beamer},
-normal emphasizing and boldface can lead to \LaTeX{} errors, e.\,g.
-when used in section headings.
-\end{block}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{Specific environments}
-\begin{frame}{Specific environments}
-
-Specific environments, particularly suited for presentations are:
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Diverse ``blocks''
-\item Theorem-style environments
-\item Columns
-\end{itemize}
-We sketch them briefly in what follows.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Blocks}
-
-Blocks can contain all sorts of information. We used them here for
-``tips'' and ``hints''. The class provides 3 pre-defined blocks
-with different look:
-\begin{block}<2->{Block}
-
-A general-purpose block
-\end{block}
-\begin{exampleblock}<3->{Example Block}
-
-A block for ``examples''
-\end{exampleblock}
-\begin{alertblock}<4->{Alert Block}
-
-And an ``alert'' block for important remarks.
-\end{alertblock}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Handling Blocks}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item In \LyX , blocks have a similar user interface to frames, which means
-that
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Content inside blocks needs to be nested (if the paragraph layout
-is not \structure{Block})
-\item Consecutive blocks of the same type must be separated by the \structure{Separator}
-paragraph style
-\begin{block}<only at 2>{Tip}
-
-Use \alert{Edit\lyxarrow Start New Environment} (\shortcut{undefined})
-to quickly start a new block from within a previous block!
-\end{block}
-\end{itemize}
-\item Blocks are overlay-aware
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Theorem-style environments}
-
-\framesubtitle{(Theorem, Corollary, Definition, Definitions, Example, Examples,
-Fact, Proof)}
-
-Theorems look similar to blocks in the output, but they have a fixed
-title (depending on the type). 
-\begin{theorem}
-This is a theorem!
-\end{theorem}
-
-\begin{fact}
-This is a fact!
-\end{fact}
-
-
-\pause{}
-
-Via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Additional Theorem Text}, you can add
-some extra text to this fixed title
-\begin{example}[a bad one!]
-
-An example with additional text (brackets added automatically)
-\end{example}
-
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Columns}
-
-Sometimes it is useful to divide a presentation into columns
-\begin{columns}[t]
-
-\column{.4\textwidth}
-
-To do this, first select \structure{Columns} (note the plural) to
-start the columns
-
-\pause{}
-
-\column{.4\textwidth}
-
-And then, in the following paragraph, select \structure{Column} (singular)
-to start a specific column
-\end{columns}
-
-
-\pause{}
-
-\medskip{}
-
-Note:
-\begin{itemize}
-\item In the \structure{Column} (singular) environment, you need to specify
-the width using \LaTeX{} syntax (but also something like ``3.5cm''
-will work)
-\item Any (singular) \structure{Column} must be nested to the (plural)
-\structure{Columns}. Likewise, column content can be any paragraph
-style that is nested to a singular \structure{Column}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{Short remarks on modes}
-\begin{frame}{Modes}
-
-In \structure{Beamer} terms, a ``mode'' is a specific output route.
-There are several modes for different purposes. We just want to highlight
-three:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\item The ``beamer'' mode
-\item The ``presentation'' mode
-\item The ``article'' mode
-\end{enumerate}
-The beamer mode is the default. Unless explicitly specified otherwise,
-your \structure{Beamer} document is in ``beamer'' mode.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}<presentation>{Switching Modes}
-
-However, you can switch document parts, frames, headings and all ``action''-aware
-environments to a different mode. For instance, we have switched this
-frame to ``presentation'' mode.
-\begin{itemize}
-\item What does this mean?
-\begin{itemize}
-\item It means that this frame will only be visible in the presentation,
-not in the accompanying ``article'', if you produce such an article
-(we will elaborate on this a bit below)
-\end{itemize}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}<article>{Switching Modes}
-
-This frame will not be visible in the presentation, but only in the
-article, since it is in ``article'' mode.
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{So what?}
-
-This is actually pretty useful! You can set up a single document and
-produce both a presentation and \textendash{} using the article mode
-\textendash{} a handout. 
-\begin{itemize}
-\item And we mean a \emph{real}, useful handout, not one of those scaled
-slide printouts that are so common nowadays (but if you insist, you
-can produce one of those as well)
-\item Modes allow you to add extra text to the handout or hide parts from
-it
-\item You can use for instance different graphics for the presentation and
-the handout
-\item and so on \ldots{}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Examples}
-
-As said, many elements are mode-aware. 
-\begin{itemize}
-\item You can show particular text \only<presentation>{only in the presentation}\only<article>{only in the article}
-via \alert{Edit\lyxarrow Text Style\lyxarrow Only}
-\end{itemize}
-\mode<article>{\begin{itemize}
-\item Or put all sorts of complex contents via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Custom Insets\lyxarrow ArticleMode}
-in an inset that will only be output in article mode
-\end{itemize}
-}\mode<presentation>{\begin{itemize}
-\item Or put all sorts of complex contents via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow Custom Insets\lyxarrow PresentationMode}
-in an inset that will only be output in presentation mode
-\end{itemize}
-}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Or you can define that an \emph<presentation>{emphasizing} should
-only apply to the presentation, \textbf<article>{a bold face} only
-to article
-\item You can also show section headings or frame titles\slash subtitles
-only in the presentation\slash article (like we do for the ``Contents''
-and ``References'' frame titles in this presentation)
-\item And much more of this sort \ldots{}
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Setting up an article}
-
-Setting up a beamer article with \LyX{} is easy.
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Just create a new document with the class \structure{Beamer Article (Standard Class)}
-or \structure{Beamer Article (KOMA-Script)}
-\item Then add the presentation to this document as a child (via \alert{Insert\lyxarrow File\lyxarrow Child Document\ldots})
-\item And that's it. Now you can produce the handout and the presentation
-by compiling one of these two documents, while you only need to edit
-one, namely the presentation
-\end{itemize}
-Check out the accompanying beamer-article example document for this
-presentation. You can find it in the same folder as this document.
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{Changing the look}
-\begin{frame}{Themes}
-\begin{itemize}
-\item \structure{Beamer} presentations are themeable. Themes determine
-the colors used, the macro structure (use of sidebars, headlines etc.),
-the fonts, the look of list items, blocks and in general the whole
-look and feel of a presentation
-\item \structure{Beamer} itself ships a number of different-looking themes
-to chose from (we use the ``Berkeley'' theme in this presentation;
-see \alert{Document\lyxarrow Settings\lyxarrow\LaTeX{} Preamble}
-for how we activated and slightly tweaked the theme)
-\item In addition to this standard set, you can get more themes from \href{http://www.ctan.org}{CTAN}
-and other places at the Internet
-\item If you still are not satisified or if you need a theme matching to
-your University's or company's corporate design, the \structure{Beamer}
-manual \cite{beamer-ug} explains how you can setup your own theme
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{frame}{Themes can be modified}
-
-But you do not need to write a theme from scratch if you want to alter
-the look.
-\begin{itemize}
-\item Existing themes can be modified both in details and in major areas
-(such as the coloring)
-\item Consult the \structure{Beamer} manual \cite{beamer-ug} for details
-\end{itemize}
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\section{And more \ldots}
-\begin{frame}{\ldots{} much more!}
-
-Note that \structure{Beamer} can do much more than we have described
-here. The \structure{Beamer} manual \cite{beamer-ug} provides a
-comprehensive documentation.
-
-Also, have a look at the \structure{Beamer} examples and templates
-shipped with \LyX !
-\end{frame}
-%
-
-\appendix
-
-\section{Appendix}
-
-\begin{frame}
-
-\frametitle<presentation>{References}
-
-\end{frame}
-%
-\begin{thebibliography}{1}
-\bibitem{beamer-ug}Tantau, Till et al.:\newblock The beamer class.
-\url{https://ctan.org/tex-archive/macros/latex/contrib/beamer/doc/beameruserguide.pdf}.
-\end{thebibliography}
-%
-
-\end{document}
diff --git a/development/cmake/modules/FindEnchant.cmake b/development/cmake/modules/FindEnchant.cmake
deleted file mode 100644
index d7548a8..0000000
--- a/development/cmake/modules/FindEnchant.cmake
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,22 +0,0 @@
-if(WIN32)
-	find_library(ENCHANT_LIBRARY "libenchant")
-	find_path(ENCHANT_INCLUDE_DIR "enchant++.h")
-else()
-  find_library(ENCHANT_LIBRARY "enchant"  
-	"/usr/local/lib" 
-	${SYSTEM_LIB_DIRS}
-	"/opt/local/lib")
-  find_path(ENCHANT_INCLUDE_DIR "enchant++.h" PATHS 
-		/usr/local/include
-		/usr/local/include/enchant
-		/usr/include
-		/usr/include/enchant
-		/opt/local/include/enchant)
-endif()
-
-# handle the QUIETLY and REQUIRED arguments and
-# set ENCHANT_FOUND to TRUE if all listed variables are TRUE
-include(FindPackageHandleStandardArgs)
-find_package_handle_standard_args(ENCHANT DEFAULT_MSG ENCHANT_LIBRARY ENCHANT_INCLUDE_DIR)
-
-mark_as_advanced(ENCHANT_LIBRARY ENCHANT_INCLUDE_DIR)
diff --git a/development/cmake/modules/FindHunspell.cmake b/development/cmake/modules/FindHunspell.cmake
deleted file mode 100644
index ad08ad6..0000000
--- a/development/cmake/modules/FindHunspell.cmake
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,21 +0,0 @@
-
-if(WIN32)
-  find_library(HUNSPELL_LIBRARY "libhunspell")
-else()
-  find_library(HUNSPELL_LIBRARY NAMES "hunspell" "hunspell-1.2" PATHS "/usr/local/lib" ${SYSTEM_LIB_DIRS} "/usr/lib64")
-endif()
-
-FIND_PATH(HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR "hunspell.hxx")
-if (NOT HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR)
-  FIND_PATH(HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR "hunspell/hunspell.hxx")
-  if (HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR)
-    set(HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR "${HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR}/hunspell")
-  endif()
-endif()
-
-# handle the QUIETLY and REQUIRED arguments and
-# set HUNSPELL_FOUND to TRUE if all listed variables are TRUE
-include(FindPackageHandleStandardArgs)
-find_package_handle_standard_args(HUNSPELL DEFAULT_MSG HUNSPELL_LIBRARY HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR)
-
-mark_as_advanced(HUNSPELL_LIBRARY HUNSPELL_INCLUDE_DIR)


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